Scouts BSA

Make Friends. Catch Fish. Earn Badges. Climb Rocks. Explore Caves. Take Hikes. Visit Museums. Launch Rockets. Roast Marshmallows. Take Pictures. Help People. Discover Trails. Ride Bikes. Play Sports. Learn Games. Build Character. Gain Confidence. Hit Targets. Laugh Loud. Grow Better. Race Cars. Camp Out. Work Together. Have Fun.

Turning Good Kids Into Tomorrow's Leaders

With more than 130 Merit Badges—from Archery and Art to Welding and Wilderness Survival—Scouting is the ultimate form of learning by doing. Scouts BSA explore their interests and improve their skills while working toward Scouting’s highest rank: Eagle. By first imagining, planning then doing their own service projects, Scouts BSA learn the value of hard work, and experience the thrill of seeing it pay off. Add in outdoor adventures, hiking and camping, and Scouting gives boys and girls all the experience they need to become men and women.

 

PURPOSE OF THE BSA

The Boy Scouts of America was incorporated to provide a program for community organizations that offers effective character, citizenship, and personal fitness training for youth.

Specifically, the BSA endeavors to develop American citizens who are physically, mentally, and emotionally fit; have a high degree of self-reliance as evidenced in such qualities as initiative, courage, and resourcefulness; have personal values based on religious concepts; have the desire and skills to help others; understand the principles of the American social, economic, and governmental systems; are knowledgeable about and take pride in their American heritage and understand our nation's role in the world; have a keen respect for the basic rights of all people; and are prepared to participate in and give leadership to American society.

 

SCOUTS BSA PROGRAM MEMBERSHIP

Scouts BSA is a year-round program for boys and girls age 11 - 17. Boys and girls who are 10 may join if they have received the Arrow of Light Award or have finished the fifth grade. Scouts BSA is a program of fun outdoor activities, peer group leadership opportunities, and a personal exploration of career, hobby and special interests, all designed to achieve the BSA's objectives of strengthening character, personal fitness and good citizenship.

 

Ready to get started?
Call the Eykamp Scout Center Today!
or visit beascout.org

VOLUNTEER SCOUTERS

Thousands of volunteer leaders, both men and women, are involved in the Scouts BSA program. They serve in a variety of jobs — everything from unit leaders to chairmen of troop committees, committee members, merit badge counselors, and chartered organization representatives.

 

Like other phases of the program, Scouts BSA is made available to community organizations having similar interests and goals. Chartered organizations include professional organizations; governmental bodies; and religious, educational, civic, fraternal, business, labor, and citizens' groups. Each organization appoints one of its members as the chartered organization representative. The organization is responsible for leadership, the meeting place, and support for troop activities.

 

THE BEGINNING OF SCOUTING

Scouting, as known to millions of youth and adults, evolved during the early 1900s through the efforts of several men dedicated to bettering youth. These pioneers of the program conceived outdoor activities that developed skills in young boys and gave them a sense of enjoyment, fellowship, and a code of conduct for everyday living.

 

In this country and abroad at the turn of the century, it was thought that children needed certain kinds of education that the schools couldn't or didn't provide. This led to the formation of a variety of youth groups, many with the word "Scout" in their names. For example, Ernest Thompson Seton, an American naturalist, artist, writer, and lecturer, originated a group called the Woodcraft Indians and in 1902 wrote a guidebook for boys in his organization called the Birch Bark Roll. Meanwhile in Britain, Robert Baden-Powell, after returning to his country a hero following military service in Africa, found boys reading the manual he had written for his regiment on stalking and survival in the wild. Gathering ideas from Seton, America's Daniel Carter Beard, and other Scoutcraft experts, Baden-Powell rewrote his manual as a nonmilitary skill book, which he titled Scouting for Boys. The book rapidly gained a wide readership in England and soon became popular in the United States. In 1907, when Baden-Powell held the first campout for Scouts on Brownsea Island off the coast of England, troops were spontaneously springing up in America.

 

William D. Boyce, a Chicago publisher, incorporated the Boy Scouts of America in 1910 after meeting with

Baden-Powell. (Boyce was inspired to meet with the British founder by an unknown Scout who led him out of a dense London fog and refused to take a tip for doing a Good Turn.) Immediately after its incorporation, the BSA was assisted by officers of the YMCA in organizing a task force to help community organizations start and maintain a high-quality Scouting program. Those efforts climaxed in the organization of the nation's first Scout camp at Lake George, New York, directed by Ernest Thompson Seton. Beard, who had established another youth group, the Sons of Daniel Boone (which he later merged with the BSA), provided assistance. Also on hand for this historic event was James E. West, a lawyer and an advocate of children's rights, who later would become the first professional Chief Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America. Seton became the first volunteer national Chief Scout, and Beard, the first national Scout commissioner.

 

 SCOUT LAW

 

Trustworthy

A Scout tells the truth.  He keeps his promises.  Honesty is part of his code of conduct.

People can depend on him.

 

Loyal

A Scout is true to his family, Scout leaders, friends, school, and nation.

 

Helpful

A Scout is concerned about other people.  He does things willingly for others without pay or reward.

 

Friendly

A Scout is a friend to all.  He is a brother to other Scouts. He seeks to understand others. He respects those with ideas and customs other than his own.

 

Courteous

A Scout is polite to everyone regardless of age or position. He knows good manners make it easier for people to get along together.

 

Kind

A Scout understands there is strength in being gentle.  He treats others as he wants to be treated. He does not hurt or kill harmless things without reason. 

 

Obedient

A Scout follows the rules of his family, school, and troop.  He obeys the laws of his community and country. If he thinks these rules and laws are unfair, he tries to have them changed in an orderly manner rather than disobey them.

 

Cheerful

A Scout looks for the bright side of things.  He cheerfully does tasks that come his way. He tries to make others happy.

 

Thrifty

A Scout works to pay his way and to help others.  He saves for unforeseen needs. He protects and conserves natural resources.  

He carefully uses time and property.

 

Brave

A Scout can face danger even if he is afraid. He has the courage to stand for what he thinks is right even if others laugh at or threaten him.

 

Clean

A Scout keeps his body and mind fit and clean.  He goes around with those who believe in living by these same ideals. He helps keep his home and community clean.

 

Reverent

A Scout is reverent toward God.  He is faithful in his religious duties. He respects the beliefs of others. 

SCOUT OATH (or PROMISE)                                                                           

On my honor I will do my best

To do my duty to God and my country

and to obey the Scout Law;

To help other people at all times;

To keep myself physically strong,

mentally awake, and morally straight.

SCOUT MOTTO 

Be Prepared

                                   

SCOUT SLOGAN 

Do a Good Turn Daily

 

Eykamp Scout Center Hours:

Monday - Friday 8:30 to 5:00

Gaither Scout Shop:

Monday - Friday 8:30 to 5:00

Saturday 9:00 - 1:00 (Excluding Holidays)

All Times are Central Time

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3501 E. Lloyd Expressway

Evansville, IN 47715

(812) 423-5246

Fax (812) 423-4845

Old Ben Scout Reservation

5735 E County Road 175 N

Winslow, IN 47598

Knox County

Pike County

Gibson County  

Perry County

Posey County

Southwest Indiana